Finding the Time

One of the biggest struggles to consistently working out is finding the time. Eric, one of our operations specialists, looked at the problem only as an operations specialist could. After analyzing his schedule, he found he could create the time, but it required a change is the way he gets to and from the office. Here is his story:

EricLike many of us, it was a challenge for me to fit physical activity into my busy schedule. Between family, work, friends, and a myriad of miscellaneous responsibilities exercise often fell by the wayside. As the inevitable effects of this inactivity manifested themselves, it became apparent that I needed to find the time…….somehow.

Following a thorough analysis of my available time, I discovered that incorporating exercise into my daily commute was the solution. I was unwilling to sacrifice my time in others areas of my life i.e. kids, chores, sleep, recreational activities, etc. but my daily commute presented an opportunity. Given my proximity to work, walking, running, or some equivalent option was not viable. Those activities would have taken more additional time than I could afford. Though, I discovered that cycling to work add only 30 minutes to my commute, round-trip. Logically, it was an easy decision.

Despite the soundness of the logic, I still had some reservations. I had never been much of a cyclist. Of course, I learned to ride a bike when I was young and it was the preferred modus operandi for transportation before I was able to drive, but I never anticipated that it would become a large part of my life. I would see cyclists on the road and derisively snicker at their shorts and matching shirts (I have two sets now) or grumble about their brashness in traffic. Certainly, I never thought that I would become one of THEM.

Also, a major downside to this form of exercise is the initial cost; I had to come up with an initial investment for a quality (aka dependable) bike. Plus, I needed to acquire the necessities like a waterproof bag, lights, helmet, clothing, anti-theft protection, etc. I found it especially difficult to justify this cost because I didn’t have any evidence that I would really like it. Thankfully, I took the gamble and acquired the equipment so I could at least give it a shot. Again, given my time constraints I had to try.

My first few rides were wonderful: great weather, a feeling of accomplishment, the adulation of my friends/family. These were easy days to ride but life-style/routine changes are particularly tough and after the honeymoon stage wore off, it wasn’t always so easy to get excited in the morning for that ride……especially on days when it was cold or rainy.

Thankfully, the vast benefits of cycling daily motivated me through the difficult days and eventually the routine set-in. Now, I don’t even think about the commute – it’s just how I get to work. My energy level throughout the day is considerably higher, my mood is improved, and my productivity is enhanced. Each person is different and finding a physical activity that you enjoy is a challenge. Ultimately, for me, it is cycling and it has enriched my life infinitely………..and it only cost me an additional 30 minutes a day.

If you liked this story, check out Elaina’s story about her family’s decision to switch to bikes for their everyday transportation.

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1 Comment

  1. Brilliant. I also exercise on my commute, cycling then either scooting or walking or running! It’s a great way to keep fit without taking time out of your home life. All about the fit commute! And you save money too 😊 once you’ve brought your bike that is… X

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